Dog Obedience Training: Being the Boss

Dogs are naturally pack animals. This means they need an alpha to lead them in their everyday lives, and this also means the owner must act alpha; that the dog should consider you as the boss for the training training to proceed smoothly. Individual dogs vary in submissiveness, and to establish and maintain dominance over your dog, there are a number of exercises you can establish. Do not worry; most dogs are happy to be submissive. Just be sure to show approval at the occasional signs of submission, and assert dominance if it tries to test you.

There are two components of training, one that solves behavioral problems, and there is that one that creates a command-response pattern. The latter type is called "Obedience Training". However, both need one factor: A good Alpha.

In most cases, people misinterpret adolescent behavior as "dominance" when they are not. Comparing it to a human child testing her parents; she is trying to find out what the limits are rather than actually putting her parents in the little game called "Challenge Me" for leadership, a playful act. Young dogs and puppies do exactly the same. Which is, the trainer must correct them firmly, however don’t go into an all out dominating battle.

It would be very inappropriate for the dog to distrust you, which, in this case can result some sort of "rebellion". For the toddler analogy, the most one can do is a sharp word, or a small spank on the rear end. You would not pick the child up, and hold her against the wall, then scream at her for the misdeed. Most dogs are still young until they are 2 or 3 years old (in human terms, they are still in the angst, teenage years). In Layman’s terms, do not confuse physical maturity with mental maturity.

As for punishments are concerned, never mistake it with being alpha. An alpha is fair, according to Cindy Moore, author of Behavior: Modifying and Understanding. An alpha leader is fair, and deserves its position. He/She does not use fear, punishment or brute force to achieve, and maintain its position. Instead, it makes it clear what behavior approves of and which it does not. An alpha leader expects its subordinates to follow its lead; it does not force them to do whatever it is. Meaning, the owner or trainer, in order for it to be a good leader, should be calm, focused, and rational.

Just like any other dog training, praising your pet boosts a lot of good egos. Always show approval at signs of submission. This helps strengthen your place as the ultimate alpha. Praise your dog when it drops its eyes first. Praise it when he licks your chin. Give it an enthusiastic tummy rub, when it rolls over in its back –as how Cindy placed it. It might sound corny, but it is corny because it works. Life is simple; you just need a bit of loving.

But to be an alpha at your best is to be consistent, and fair in your corrections. One must demonstrate to your pet that it can trust your orders. Do not correct your dog after the fact; such corrections to be arbitrary and unfair to the dog, since it has no associative memory the way people do.

Socializing with your puppy is a good way to gain its trust.


Dog Obedience House Training – How To Go about It

House training is a very important phase in a dog’s life. It secures the tight bond and good relationship between the master and the dog. Experts advice that house training must start while the dog is young. In this sense, your pet’s misbehavior will be corrected at such an early time. Therefore, the sooner that you start with dog obedience house training, the better.

Here are the guidelines on how you should go about dog obedience house training.

Let him have his own space.

The untrained puppies or dogs should not be allowed wandering around the house without any supervision. You may not know it but your pet might already be chewing on things and worse, may get themselves injured or electrocuted. If you are at home, be sure to keep him in a place where you can see him easily. If there will be a time that he will be left alone, better place him in his den or crate. Put a bed of his own that can be made out of a box or towel, some toys, his water and food. Be sure to let him have his own playtime too so he can have enough exercise.

Introduce him to new areas.

After you have taught him how to behave in his own place, it is now time to introduce him to the other areas of your home. Be sure to spend time with him in that area. If you want to show him the new place where he can eat, do it under your supervision. Introduce the places and what he is allowed and disallowed to do in these areas. Do this by leashing him so as to control his reactions. Unleash him when you think he already has gotten himself familiar with the new areas. But, remember to keep watch or else he might get into trouble and cause further damages.

Potty train him.

Show him the area where he can do his thing. Make sure not to confuse him. Never allow him to play in that area or he might get the idea that he can use the same place for all his activities.

Let him understand the "No Chew" command.

By nature, dogs like to chew on things since it aids in the strengthening of their teeth and gums. It is also kind of a healthy exercise for their jaws. Part of your dog obedience house training is providing him with toys that he may chew on and let him understand that not all things can be used to strengthen his teeth and gums. Be stern as you give him the "no chew" command. Praise him when he has done the right thing and give him a reward.

Set off limits areas.

It is always important to keep your dog away from the rooms that contain pieces of furniture and where the electric lines are. Give him the "off" command and when he does follow it, pat him and praise him.

By and large, dog obedience house training will benefit you in the future. So, start early!


Can Speaking And Singing Stop A Nuisance Barker?

How do you stop a nuisance barker? Easy: Teach them how to "speak" and "sing". This might be more interesting for bothersome humans, but just way cuter for canines. All types of dogs, may it be size or breed, can be easily taught to speak. The way for it to go is to call your dog, show him a treat (which never disappoints), and say "Speak".

The dog might probably not understand what you are trying to make him do, and probably would dart on the treat, jumps, and will eye it intently at first. Finally, he will sit down, gets impatient, and then utters a sharp bark which is what you have been waiting for, and for that instant when he does so, reward him with a treat.

Not all dogs love to bark. Just like humans, some are aggressive, and some are just plainly shy. For these types of dogs, they can be encouraged to do so by imitating a bark. Chances are, he will reply to it. Reward him, a never-disappointing deed of all time, then he will learn to bark as soon as he hears the word "speak". Now, after the dogs have been taught to bark once, you can teach him a series of barks. This way, you can make him expect to be rewarded, which encourages him to bark more until you give him a stop signal, which can lead to a full phrase, or whichever you want him to do.

Other than being social beings, dogs are very observant. By the time you signal your pet to stop at the slightest point, your friends won’t detect the magic trick, such as subtle movements of hands and feet; a wink or a shift of your gaze, and if you keep up with these tricks, you might be firing up an interesting series of barks that can sound as if your pet is having a conversation. You can address him as if he was a human being to keep his performance appealing, impressive, and very perplexing.

Demonstrating the latter, if you are exhibiting your dog to an audience, and might want him to "speak", you would like to be a bit more creative like asking him a question. That way, you can probably be in a very good business as to have a "talking dog". Either way, that is much better than pestering barks in the neighborhood.

Now that your dog can now "speak", you can now teach him how to "sing". Try making him imitate a series of whines and howls to a certain degree, reaching the pitch, and the style of noise you desire. As your pet learns how to follow you, say "sing" automatically to associate the desired action. With constant practice, a dog can and will learn to follow your turn quite accurately. Do not forget to praise and treat him plentifully for encouragement. Exercise the activity on a regular basis.

By this type of dog training, not only have you got rid of a nuisance dog, you have disciplined your pet vigorously, making him understand that barking and whining is only allowed in command. And now, for the humans.


Basic Commands For Dog Training

Are you bored with your dog who knows only three commands? Don’t fret, my friend! You could probably use a little jazz. Specific command words are not that difficult and important. The thing here should be the consistency of its usage. My friend, Wiki, here can give you a bit of a blast. Some of these certain commands are accepted as standard, while others are commonly used.

Here is a list you might find quite interesting:

Let us start off with the basic commands

  1. Sit – it is a mono-syllabic word that requires a bit of an authentic tone that would require for your dog to be in a sitting position.
  2. Down – just like #1, this also requires an abrupt tone for the dog to be typically down when its elbows (front feet and hocks (rear legs are touching the ground or floor.
  3. Heel – The dog’s head or shoulder is parallel to the handler’s leg on the left side of the handler.
  4. Come or Here – (referred to as the recall you just really got to call your dog which equates the whole command.
  5. Stay – another command that requires another snap for the dog to remain in the sitting position (sit, down, stand, and location under which the command was given until it is released by the handler

Those were just some of the basic ones, but wait! Here is something for those who are too hungry to actually stop. The advanced commands are the following (which may need more patience and dedication:

  1. Stop – Wiki says that the dog commanded will simply stop whatever it is doing, and lie down on command no matter how far it is from its keeper is a dog that can be taken anywhere. Some handlers use the German word PLATZ (related to place, i.e. stay in position for this action. A little bit demanding, but who knows when your dogs needs it.
  2. Back up – keepers of large dogs or dogs with reputation (a must quote! for aggressiveness can make strangers more comfortable by teaching the dog to back up on command. This command might probably be very useful for police dogs.
  3. Growl – now this is what you guys should be talking about. In case you are bullied, this is the inverse of backing up. Some owners teach non-aggressive dogs to growl on a subtle command –not the word "growl", just usually a small hand gesture –as a way of letting strangers know that you and your dog value being left alone.
  4. Steady – to keep near by. The dog can walk free, but not dash off. This can be very valuable to sport dogs, and/or during competitions.
  5. Stand – on this command, the dog stands still. Funny how this is seems so advanced; it is very valuable for "grooming". Many dogs are groomed frequently, that they need to stand quietly during the process. You can also use this when you want your dog to wait for you at the park, while lining up for an espresso at Starbucks seven in the morning.
  6. Go to bed, kennel, or get in – this command directs the dog to go to its bed, and remain there unreleased. This is somehow useful to keep a dog out from underfoot, and safe in a busy or complicated situation.
  7. Drop or Drop it – to release something they just picked up; very useful when they’re about to chew your sandals off.
  8. Leave it – an adjunction to Drop, directing the dog NOT to touch an item.
  9. Take it – the dog leaves a desired object untouched until given this command.
  10. Give – a command teaching the dog to be generous, and/or releasing something your pet has placed in his mouth on your hand.
  11. Speak – another way of saying "to bark ONLY when I say so".
  12. Roll over – can be one of the basic commands; this is when the dog lies down, roll over, and stand back up. Quite a bit of an exercise.
  13. Attack – if partnered with the command "Growl", you (the owner will be the king of your neighborhood, though mostly used only on Police Dogs. Common commands are either "Attack" or "Sick’em".
  14. Fetch – can also be one of the basic commands where the dog retrieves a thrown object, bringing it back to the one who threw it, a nice strategy for luring guard dogs (especially when they’re obsessed with balls.